Skip to content

Posts tagged "protected bike lane"

StreetFilms
View Comments

Obama Becomes First Prez to Walk Down a Bike Lane on Inauguration Day

The networks were busy tripping over themselves trying to point out all the "firsts" during yesterday's inauguration ceremonies. But when Barack and Michelle Obama stepped out of the presidential motorcade to greet well wishers on Pennsylvania Avenue, they missed a huge one: Obama is now the first U.S. president to walk down a bike lane during his inauguration.

The center-median, two-way bicycle lane down Pennsylvania was implemented by DDOT back in summer 2010, so this is the first inauguration to feature the new look. Check out this clip from ABC News that shows the president stepping out of his limo and almost right on top of a bike stencil...

We've done some Streetfilms featuring some great bicycling from the capital.  Check out this Streetfilm on DC's Capital BikeShare and this one from the 2011 National Bike Summit, which features many scenes of the Pennsylvania Ave bike lane in action.

StreetFilms
View Comments

How Complete Streets Came to East Harlem

This is the story about how East Harlem residents and street safety advocates -- with leadership from Council Member Melissa Mark-Viverito -- banded together to win complete streets on First and Second Avenues. After the city backtracked on a plan to build protected bike lanes and pedestrian refuges up to 125th Street on the East Side of Manhattan, this coalition mobilized to put the project back on the table. Later, when the safety improvements came under attack from a few business owners, public health professionals joined Mark-Viverito and NYC DOT to combat misinformation about the redesign and see it through to implementation.

Former Streetsblog Reporter Noah Kazis covered the campaign for protected bike lanes in East Harlem and helps recount the story in this video.

StreetFilms
View Comments

Celebrating NYC Bicycling 2011: A Tribute

Cycling in New York City overcame a much undeserved, unfair, zealous media bombardment in 2011.  But as usual we just kept biking and NYC's numbers kept growing - doubling since 2007. And as demonstrated over and over, public opinion polls show cycling & bike lanes enjoy broad support in the general public, a fact that the media seems to ignore.

So we figured let's celebrate the end of 2011 showing some of people out on their bikes Streetfilms style. (And we threw in a bunch of real FACTS in case CBS2 news decides to take a gander.)

StreetFilms
View Comments

Kinzie Street: The First of Many Protected Bike Lanes for Chicago

In his campaign for mayor, Rahm Emanuel pledged to make Chicago a more bike-friendly city. And in office, he set his sights high, aiming to construct 100 miles of protected bike lanes in his first term.

His team wasted no time. Chicago DOT installed the city's first protected bike lane on Kinzie Street before Emanuel's first 30 days in office were over. Leading Emanuel's DOT is former Washington, DC DOT Commissioner Gabe Klein, who clearly understands the connection between safe streets and the health of a city.

Last month Streetfilms traveled to Chicago to speak with the commissioner, ride on Kinzie Street, and bask in the city's cycling excitement.

And one piece of local trivia. The Blommer Chocolate Store is right on the Kinzie Street protected bike lane and boy does it smell good. It figured prominently in my all-time favorite response to an interview question about biking.

StreetFilms
View Comments

The Phenomenal Success of Capital Bikeshare

Nearly three years ago Streetfilms took a day trip to Washington, D.C. to see their Smart Bike DC  in action.  We found the trial bike share system a fun ride with great potential, but with only 120 bikes there wasn't a great sense of widespread use.

Flashforward to 2011 and with over 1100 bicycles and 110 stations D.C.'s Capital Bikeshare's is amazing testament to having to "go big or go home" when deploying bike share programs.  Currently the largest bike share system in the United States, the District's 2.0 version gives users much more flexibility and options to accomplish short errands, commute to work, and to integrate other transit modes into their daily lives.

In fact, the next phase of expansion has just been announced, with 18 more stations and 265 more bikes coming this Fall.

The handsome red bikes are easy to ride, with one swipe of a keycard you're off and biking. During the am and pm commutes (and lunch hours) you'll see the bikes in very heavy rotation.  But what left Streetfilms most flabbergasted was how many people were riding them in full business attire in the hot & humid summers around the Capital. If that isn't a sign of success, what is?

Streetfilms would like to thank the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) for partnering with us on this project.

 

StreetFilms
View Comments

Queens Plaza Protected Cycletrack is Open for Business

Using a bicycle in Queens just got more safe and efficient for riders that use the Queens Plaza area to access the Queensboro Bridge bike and pedestrian path.

Yesterday afternoon, Streetfilms got tips from fans saying the physically protected bike & pedestrian median was finally open. By the time we got there, scores of folks were already taking advantage - many with big, hearty smiles when they saw the path was welcoming their first ride on it.  We tried to give you the full experience from as many angles as possible during this nearly half-mile journey, another protected bike facility in New York City.

Amazingly, one of the most congested, noisy, chaotic and ugly spots in the city, now feels like an oasis of green and safety.  Dare we even say, pleasant!  And more importantly: it now allows cyclists to avoid multiple blocks of annoying navigation to and from Queens Boulevard.  It also gets rid of dangerous wrong way riding by cyclists by finally accomodating their desire to travel east.

StreetFilms
View Comments

My NYC Biking Story: Steve O’Neill

Prospect Heights resident Steve O'Neill has been biking most of his 15 years living in New York City.  Last year he added to his daily roundtrip commute to Columbus Circle by dropping his son Beckett off at school, and the new Prospect Park West bike lane helps him do that safely.

As a subway trip it took 30 minutes, a subway transfer and nearly 200 steps, but by using the bike Beckett gets to school in just ten minutes.  He enjoys it and Steve says, "the last time I didn't ride it was winter and it was really snowy and he was begging to go on the bike instead of the subway."